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Fundus
Care
Breast Care & Preventing Infections
Bowel
Habits
Diet/Activity/
Exercise
C-Section
Care
Sex & Birth
Control
Postpartum
Depression
Transition To
Parenthood

Cesarean Section
If you had a cesarean section, infection control and prevention is very important. This can be done by good hand washing and aseptic techniques. Keep the incision dry and clean and be aware of any changes to the operative site such as redness, discharge, swelling, warmth to area, or an increase amount of pain. Having a fever ≥ 100.4˚F or any of the above mentioned changes that may occur during your healing process, notify your midwife or provider immediately.

You will want to have help around the house for at least the first week. Let your body heal. You can take care of the baby and yourself during the 1st week, but you will need help with other children, cleaning, cooking, and other activities. By the 2nd week you should be able to start doing some abdominal exercises along with short walks. Listen to your body. Do not lift or push anything heavy until you are cleared by your provider to resume normal activities usually around postpartum week 6. The incision will heal and by 6-12 months postpartum the scar will fade to a lighter shade of your skin tone.

If you plan on having more children, you will need to speak with your provider about the risk and benefits of having a vaginal birth after cesarean section versus having a repeat cesarean section.